Responsible Choices

Vaccinating, and not vaccinating, come with responsibility to oneself, one’s children, and the community. Both vaccinated and non-vaccinated are capable of spreading infection and of being infected. For each choice, it’s important to know the risks, benefits, and limitations of those choices, and it’s important to have a “game plan” in case of disease antigen (wild or vaccine-strain) exposure.

Personalized Medicine: The future of Vaccination. Genetics matter.

What are the implications of what Dr. Gregory Poland explains in the video? For some, there is a genetic component to adverse reactions. One-size vaccines and one-size vaccination schedules and do NOT fit all.

“Somali Americans develop twice the antibody response to rubella from the current vaccine compared to Caucasians in a new Mayo Clinic study on individualized aspects of immune response. A non-Somali, African-American cohort ranked next in immune response, still significantly higher than Caucasians, and Hispanic Americans in the study were least responsive to the vaccine. The findings appear in the journal Vaccine.”

Could this finding explain why the Somali-American community experiences higher rates of adverse reactions to MMR? Why autism rates in their communities are double the national average? Why other population groups tend to have more outbreaks of mumps, even though fully vaccinated? If antibody response to the “R” component of MMR is very high, how does that impact the immune response to the M (measles) and the M (mumps) components? We look forward to further research from the Mayo Clinic.

Responsibilities when choosing vaccination

  • know the vaccination risks to yourself/child
  • know the risks of wild/vaccine derived exposure to yourself/your child
  • know how mitochondrial health impacts risk of adverse reaction
  • know your genetic risk for adverse reaction
  • know why personalized medicine is crucial to safety
  • know how to spot an acute or slowly-evolving reaction
  • know how to respond to vaccine reactions
  • know what other infection risks are increased by each vaccine*
  • know how to recognize or suspect infection in your vaccinated child
  • know in advance how you will address any infection that occurs
  • know the effectiveness of each vaccine
  • know the limitations of each vaccine and act accordingly to avoid spreading infection**
  • stay home and use proper precautions when sick
  • avoid spreading infection: wash hands, cover sneezes and coughs, etc.
  • maintain optimal immune health

Responsibilities when choosing not to vaccinate

  • know the risks of wild/vaccine derived exposure to yourself/your child**
  • know to recognize or suspect infection in your child
  • know in advance how you will address any infection that occurs
  • stay home and use proper precautions when sick
  • avoid spreading infection: wash hands, cover sneezes and coughs, etc.
  • maintain optimal immune health

*Vaccines that increase risk of other infections

(this section under construction, more data to come)

**Vaccines capable of creating asymptomatic carriers (no or few symptoms of illness yet able to colonize and spread) or typical carriers (due to non-responders and waning immunity)

(this section under construction, more data to come)

  1. Pertussis. The pertussis vaccine has been found to increase colonization in those exposed to pertussis, and this has created a very dangerous situation and outbreaks in fully vaccinated populations as well as unwitting spreading of infection to vulnerable population groups, such as infants. The pertussis vaccine is for limited personal protection only, wanes quickly, and becomes less effective with each dose. It cannot prevent the colonization or spreading of infection. Please see our Pertussis Page.
  2. Diphtheria. The diphtheria toxoid vaccine is directed against the diphtheria toxin, not against the diphtheria infection, which means it is for personal protection only and does not prevent the spread of infection.
  3. Polio. IPV, the inactivated polio vaccine, is for personal protection only since it, too, does not prevent transmission of the poliovirus.
  4. Measles. Measles outbreaks have occurred in nonvaccinated and vaccinated communities. As a live vaccine, there is potential for recipient infection as well as shedding following vaccination.
  5. Mumps. Mumps is spreading among fully vaccinated communities. As a live vaccine, there is potential for recipient infection as well as shedding following vaccination.
  6. Rubella. Rubella is a live vaccine, there is potential for recipient infection as well as shedding following vaccination.
  7. Varicella. Varicella is a live vaccine, there is potential for recipient infection as well as shedding following vaccination, and due to the nature of the virus, vaccine programs have led to an increase in shingles. The shingles vaccine is an ultra-potent varicella vaccine, and it too can cause chickenpox or shingles.

 

Evidence of unintended consequences

(this section under construction, more data to come)

Disclaimer

The information contained on this page and on this website is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal or medical advice. Both the law and medicine are subject to frequent changes. Please see your medical provider and/or legal advisor.